2005 eFellows

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Jennifer Charteris

This project was a case study involving underachieving students who are gifted. The students worked with Macromedia Flash and Adobe Photoshop. The research showed that this software validated these children in a way that the rest of their schooling didn't. While being creative within the context of both the high-end software and the research group equated with success, the same was not really true within the wider school community. In fact, the creative behaviours valued in the project were often the very behaviours that labelled these children 'underachievers' in other contexts. In conclusion, this project looks at how high-end software supports and extends gifted children's creative identities which are not recognised in school.

Research report: e-Learning for two generations : a case study of how ICTs can support learning at a teen parent centre (PDF, 2.7 MB) 

Jo Colbert

This research shares the journey that five children from Westmere Kindergarten have taken in extending their interests in storytelling supported by their use of ICTs. The work and the involvement of each child are examples of how powerful it is for children to be involved in their own learning, to make choices about their learning, to know that their ideas are valued. This helps them build an image of themselves as competent and capable learners. This work builds on interests that are unique to each child. However the innovative uses of ICTs by children is by no means generic, rather it is something that develops for all children at our centre.

Research report: Storytelling: Keeping it complex (PDF, 618 KB)

Lyn Dashper

Nga Taonga Puoro is a research project that involves students making and playing traditional Maori musical instruments. The students used a range of ICTs to document these experiences. The activities engaged these students, who identify as Maori. During the first part of the project, students actually construct their own instruments and play them. The second part involves them creating an e-learning presentation about the making of their Taonga Puoro.

This research project arose as a result of a trial undertaken in 2004. Learning about the Maori musical instruments was a new and exciting area for the students, regardless of their ethnic background.

Research report: Nga Taonga Puoro (PDF, 950 KB)

Rod Dowling

Most secondary school pupils in New Zealand are using the internet mainly for research purposes, and their school websites are mainly seen as a promotional tool. My project seeks to find whether e-publication in a more transparent way of curriculum details: reaching goals; subject content; assessment criteria; timelines and so on, encourages pupils, parents and teachers to engage more in the learning process. A sample of 100 parents and year 10 pupils is being studied, using an Interact site to which they will all have access. Providing better on-line access to what often happens 'behind closed classroom doors' in secondary schools may be a simple, less threatening way for the parents to become more involved and supportive of the teaching and learning process.

Research report: Does e-publication of curriculum details and support resources online lead to more engagement in the learning process? (PDF, 1.4 MB)

Mark Edwards

In researching the way in which the application of ICTs increases enthusiasm and motivation in the learning of music. It has been evident that music technology provides an authentic learning environment. Where the school context mirrors the children's experiences outside the classroom, the use of technologies like Playstations, Apple eMacs and keyboards can enthuse, motivate and empower.

Research report: Music technology, enthusing and empowering students to compose their own music: a research project investigating how the use of ICT can be used to enthuse student learning in music (PDF, 766 KB)

Keri Hunt

Have you ever wondered, "How can I focus my students' talk to allow them to develop and use the skills I am modelling. How can I allow access and control to the learning for the learner? What tools can I use?"

This research aimed to produce a study that would be useful to the classroom teacher – that might lead to an 'aha, I could use that' moment for members of the professional community. This research explores whether ICTs can enhance children's talk when forming intentions in their writing.

Research report:

Indra Neville

This project was a case study involving underachieving students who are gifted. The students worked with Macromedia Flash and Adobe Photoshop. The research showed that this software validated these children in a way that the rest of their schooling didn't. While being creative within the context of both the high-end software and the research group equated with success, the same was not really true within the wider school community. In fact, the creative behaviours valued in the project were often the very behaviours that labelled these children 'underachievers' in other contexts. In conclusion, this project looks at how high-end software supports and extends gifted children's creative identities which are not recognised in school.

Research report: High-end creativity: what impact can the use of high-end software have on the creativity of gifted underachievers? (PDF, 2.1 MB)

David Okey

This research studied a model of ICT professional development based on a trickle down effect from lead teachers. The study focused on whether the lead teacher model offered a sustainable model of professional development once the cluster funding had stopped.

The research found that most secondary teachers were very competent users of ICT for their personal and professional uses, in contrast to the perception of teachers as reluctant users of ICT. However, the research also found that many teachers were not so confident about using ICTs with their students or how to integrate ICT into their curriculum area. The was especially pronounced in the senior school where almost no uses of ICTs were found. The exceptions were a small number of specialist subject uses.

Research report: Where to after the cluster: sustaining ICT PD after the cluster money finishes (PDF, 319 KB)

Andrea Trapp

In this research autonomy is defined as students having self-direction in their learning, and making decisions about governing their learning, goals and behaviour, with an awareness of themselves and the effect they can have on others. A set of indicators of autonomy was developed for the purpose of this study. During this research the students worked towards producing a project for the school's science fair. The students were learning through and with ICTs, and were encouraged to explore the possibilities of the technology available to them. Our main ICTs were: digital camera, digital video camera, voice recorder, lap and desktop computers, data projector, TV and video player. The students were using a self assessment tool to evaluate their autonomous learning behaviours against the indicators.

Research report: What is the relationship between teacher questioning, ICT use and student autonomy? (PDF, 1.3 MB)

Judy Waterhouse

People with physical disabilities depend on assistive technologies to provide as much independence as possible. There is an expectation that the technologically complex assistive devices will lead to success for a student. The challenge for teachers is how best to use these tools to support students to be active learners. Issues for teachers may include confidence in the application of Information and Communication Technologies including electronic assistive technologies, the time required to become skilled, adaptation of classroom programmes and materials and what to do when the device needs repair.

Research report: Electronic assistive technology tools supporting students with special education needs at school: what are the issues for teachers? (PDF, 487 KB)